Tag Archives: Perrin and the Literary Establishment

Conduct unbecoming Mark Cocker

[We apologize for the extraordinary, but absolutely necessary, length of this post]

According to John McEwen, writing in The Spectator, 11/10/14,

Mark Cocker is the naturalist of the moment, with birds his special interest.

This accolade, with dozens more, is presumably the reason that Mr Cocker felt his opinions on other nature-writers are of value, and we have just read his article Death of the naturalist in New Statesman, 17/6/15.

In our view he was by no means as even-handed in his writing of it as was the editor, Jason Cowley, in his publishing of the piece. It may be remembered that it was Jason Cowley, then editor of Granta, who anthologized in Granta 102 (2008) what could be called the cream of ‘The New Nature Writing’, and we do wonder how thoroughly he had read this ‘lecture’ by Mark Cocker—considering its content. Continue reading

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Has Jim Perrin bitten the hand that feeds him?

We have shown in several of our posts that the author, Jim Perrin, has become ‘well-embedded’ in the Welsh literary community, see: ‘Deaf ears in Wales?‘, not least by his false claims of Welsh heritage, see: ‘Jim Perrin’s family background‘. In other posts we have recorded our belief, giving examples for comparison, that he has frequently used aliases to review or comment: he always flatters his own work to an inordinate degree. On occasion he praises the book of an author he ‘admires’, but it is more usually the case that he has used the anonymity which an alias provides to write disparagingly or, at worst, with thorough-going nastiness of the work of others (see Llywarch’s poisoned pen).

‘Llywarch’s’ (JP?) risible one star review of Harriet Tuckey’s award-winning Everest, The First Ascent perfectly displays his spiteful nature and it can only be supposed that it was pure jealousy which prompted him to write it—his own book Shipton and Tilman was published in the same anniversary year, 2013, and was submitted to the same Boardman Tasker competition: perhaps he anticipated winning the award himself—he certainly reviewed it in glowing terms, see: ‘Llywarch’ on Amazon (where it will be seen that he has changed the name to ‘Tim Bartley’). Please read reviews or comments by ‘Jokerman’, ‘Llywarch’, ‘Melangell’—on the ‘Guardian’ thread, ‘DrudwyBranwen’, and, most recently, ‘Tim Bartley’ to be reminded of the ‘evidence’ which backs our theory. There are other names we suspect but have not yet listed. Continue reading

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The name-dropping game

An eagle-eyed well-wisher has contacted us with the following contribution.

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Quite often the secondary, and even the primary, purpose of the Dedication or Acknowledgments section in a book is, by dropping ‘names’, to lend a spurious authority to the work, perhaps beyond its merits. Jim Perrin is no exception to this common practice, but he takes it to a different level.

It is known that one book dedication, at least, was made by Perrin without the prior knowledge, still less the permission, of the distinguished named person* (a grave lapse in etiquette, but cunning, particularly as the permission referred to might very well not have been given); also that certain of his acknowledgments are of people not enamoured of him, who are nonetheless now permanently associated with him in print, an insidious form of irreversible literary stalking. Continue reading

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